September 17, 2020

Better Than the Great Bambino

Hebrews 3:1–11

7 Comments | Listen | Print | Full Chapter

Jesus Greater Than Moses

Therefore, holy brothers,1 you who share in a heavenly calling, consider Jesus, the apostle and high priest of our confession, who was faithful to him who appointed him, just as Moses also was faithful in all God's2 house. For Jesus has been counted worthy of more glory than Moses—as much more glory as the builder of a house has more honor than the house itself. (For every house is built by someone, but the builder of all things is God.) Now Moses was faithful in all God's house as a servant, to testify to the things that were to be spoken later, but Christ is faithful over God's house as a son. And we are his house, if indeed we hold fast our confidence and our boasting in our hope.3

A Rest for the People of God

Therefore, as the Holy Spirit says,

  “Today, if you hear his voice,
  do not harden your hearts as in the rebellion,
    on the day of testing in the wilderness,
  where your fathers put me to the test
    and saw my works for forty years.
10   Therefore I was provoked with that generation,
  and said, ‘They always go astray in their heart;
    they have not known my ways.’
11   As I swore in my wrath,
    ‘They shall not enter my rest.’”

Footnotes

[1] 3:1 Or brothers and sisters; also verse 12
[2] 3:2 Greek his; also verses 5, 6
[3] 3:6 Some manuscripts insert firm to the end

Better Than the Great Bambino



Key Verse | Hebrews 3:3

For Jesus has been counted worthy of more glory than Moses—as much more glory as the builder of a house has more honor than the house itself.

Bio | Scott Gill

Good morning! Most of my days are spent hanging out with my beautiful wife of 28 years or with one or more of my four incredible kids. When I'm not doing that, you'll probably find me teaching and coaching eighth graders. Every so often, though, I get to sneak out to the woods to hunt elk or deer or to the water to fly fish. I like to imagine myself a mountain man, but I'm probably not quite that tough. I also serve at Watermark on the Join The Journey Editorial Team and Frontlines, Watermark's hospitality ministry.

Central Truth

Jesus is the pinnacle of all of life and the greatest figure in all of history. In His faithfulness to God, Jesus surpasses even Moses and is thus worthy of more glory. No matter how tough life gets, we must resist the temptation to turn from Jesus to honor lesser things.

Devotional | Hebrews 3:1–11

"The Colossus of Clout, the King of Crash . . . the Great Bambino!" Ham Porter and the rest of the team barked at Scotty Smalls in a beloved scene from the movie Sandlot. Scotty knew little of baseball,...

"The Colossus of Clout, the King of Crash . . . the Great Bambino!" Ham Porter and the rest of the team barked at Scotty Smalls in a beloved scene from the movie Sandlot. Scotty knew little of baseball, and Ham made clear to the newbie his devotion to Babe Ruth—no other baseball player could hold a candle to him.

For a first-century Jew, Moses was the Great Bambino. He led Israel out of Egypt (Exodus 1-14), received the Law (Exodus 19), and guided them to the borders of the Promised Land (Deuteronomy 4). However, the folks addressed in the book of Hebrews had become followers of Jesus, the Redeemer, who Moses himself looked forward to (Hebrews 11:26-28). They were Christians, but now they considered leaving the faith (Hebrews 2:1-4).

Times were tough for followers of Christ. Under persecution these Jewish Christians struggled with doubt. Bad things were happening; was God sending a message? Was He unhappy with their decision? Should they go back to Judaism? People tend to do this—we read the tea leaves of circumstance and wonder if God is telling us something. When life is tough, God must be unhappy, right? These folks were doing the same, contemplating leaving the Savior that all their former traditions promised (Hebrews 8:5, 10:1).

The writer says no! Jesus is the One sent to bridge the gap to God. He's even greater than the "Great Bambino" Moses. He illustrates the difference between Jesus and Moses with the image of builders and their buildings. When I first visited the U.S. Capitol, I was amazed at the architecture, but it didn't build itself. It came to be only because of a brilliant designer. In the same way, the writer argues, the Son of God, as the builder of our house of faith—a house Moses also inhabits—is greater than all else.

Leaving Jesus to go back to Judaism would be tantamount to Israel doubting God on the border of the Promised Land. Like the believers in Hebrews, we must stay the course and not settle for less.

See Comments

Discussion Questions

1. Have you ever read the "tea leaves of circumstance" to try to understand God's will? How do you know if you read them correctly? What if, in your understanding, you were actually moving away from God rather than following Him?

2. Often tough times are a trigger for temptation. What tempts you to leave Jesus, especially when times are tough?

3. If you've never considered following Jesus, what is holding you back? He died on the cross for your sins and rose from the dead to give you peace with God. Would you consider becoming a follower of Jesus right now? All you have to do is trust in Him.

7 Comments available

Michael Scaman 3 months ago

Jesus builds a greater house than Moses and as the builder of all things that’s also a claim to divinity. “(For every house is built by someone, but the builder of all things is God.)”

Michael Scaman 3 months ago

Psalm 127 is taken on the face of it as about the Lord building a home or a city, but is a song on the way to worship at the temple and by title one of only 2 Psalms ‘of Solomon’ and unless the Lord, the greater than Solomon) builds ‘the House’ (of God, the church, the greater than the temple), it is vain.

Michael Scaman 3 months ago

In vs 10, “Therefore I was provoked with that generation,” and said, ‘They always go astray in their heart;

That’s the natural state of man. They way off is a new heart. And I think the writer is calling people to make sure you have a new heart.

Scott Gill 3 months ago
Reply right arrow

Well, Sue, if being the first means anything I’ll take it! Thank you!

Greg Jones 3 months ago

Paul reported in detail what God had done among the Gentiles through his ministry. When they heard this, they praised God. Then they said to Paul: “You see, brother, how many thousands of Jews have believed, and all of them are zealous for the law. They have been informed that you teach all the Jews who live among the Gentiles to turn away from Moses, telling them not to circumcise their children or live according to our customs.(Acts21:19-21)

Now Moses was faithful in all God’s house as a servant, to testify to the things that were to be spoken later, but Christ is faithful over God’s house as a son. And we are his house, if we hold fast our confidence and our boasting in our hope.(Hebrews3:5-6)

Moses is in the house that Christ is over. Christ(anointing)covers a Jewish and Gentile house. It takes work to separate that.

Sue Bohlin 3 months ago

Thank you, Scott. You might possibly be the only person to connect the dots between Moses and The Great Bambino!

As I have the privilege of teaching 1 Timothy at Women’s Bible Study tonight in Plano, one of the things I see in the text is Paul’s exhortation to Timothy to stay in Ephesus and not quit, even though he faced tough challenges. Over the last few years, God has kept reminded me in various scriptures how important ENDURANCE is to Him. Which also involves PERSEVERANCE. And I see in today’s reading in Hebrews how the emphasis on Moses’ and Jesus’ FAITHFULNESS underscores the importance of endurance and perseverance.

So it would seem that God is continually urging us to “Hang in there!”

Hugh Stephenson 3 months ago

Years ago, I came to my “fork-in-the-road” moment. The lead-in was a deep family crisis of my own making. Years of bad choices were coming home to roost.

Some parts of life had been great; easy, smooth, comfortable, rewarding. Just like I hoped and planned. My business prospered. I served at church. I checked all the boxes.

The catalyst was reading a devotional that cited Isaiah 30:20-21; adversity and affliction. Dumbstruck, I read the verse again. Then the whole passage and context. I NEED adversity and affliction?!?! I NEED it like I need bread and water?!?!

The food of life and the washing of regeneration.

Why would God test me like this? I wanted my old life back.

But He had other plans; https://www.watermark.org/blog/real-peace

In February 2013 Amy and I walked into Prodigal, (Proverbs 27:17).

Now I am equipped to give others hope and lovingly respond to all persecution.

View More Comments

Download The App

  • Jointhejourney app store
  • Jointhejourney play store