January 13, 2021

Yes, Even You and I

Genesis 36–40

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Esau’s Descendants

These are the generations of Esau (that is, Edom). Esau took his wives from the Canaanites: Adah the daughter of Elon the Hittite, Oholibamah the daughter of Anah the daughter1 of...

Esau’s Descendants

These are the generations of Esau (that is, Edom). Esau took his wives from the Canaanites: Adah the daughter of Elon the Hittite, Oholibamah the daughter of Anah the daughter1 of Zibeon the Hivite, and Basemath, Ishmael’s daughter, the sister of Nebaioth. And Adah bore to Esau, Eliphaz; Basemath bore Reuel; and Oholibamah bore Jeush, Jalam, and Korah. These are the sons of Esau who were born to him in the land of Canaan.

Then Esau took his wives, his sons, his daughters, and all the members of his household, his livestock, all his beasts, and all his property that he had acquired in the land of Canaan. He went into a land away from his brother Jacob. For their possessions were too great for them to dwell together. The land of their sojournings could not support them because of their livestock. So Esau settled in the hill country of Seir. (Esau is Edom.)

These are the generations of Esau the father of the Edomites in the hill country of Seir. 10 These are the names of Esau’s sons: Eliphaz the son of Adah the wife of Esau, Reuel the son of Basemath the wife of Esau. 11 The sons of Eliphaz were Teman, Omar, Zepho, Gatam, and Kenaz. 12 (Timna was a concubine of Eliphaz, Esau’s son; she bore Amalek to Eliphaz.) These are the sons of Adah, Esau’s wife. 13 These are the sons of Reuel: Nahath, Zerah, Shammah, and Mizzah. These are the sons of Basemath, Esau’s wife. 14 These are the sons of Oholibamah the daughter of Anah the daughter of Zibeon, Esau’s wife: she bore to Esau Jeush, Jalam, and Korah.

15 These are the chiefs of the sons of Esau. The sons of Eliphaz the firstborn of Esau: the chiefs Teman, Omar, Zepho, Kenaz, 16 Korah, Gatam, and Amalek; these are the chiefs of Eliphaz in the land of Edom; these are the sons of Adah. 17 These are the sons of Reuel, Esau’s son: the chiefs Nahath, Zerah, Shammah, and Mizzah; these are the chiefs of Reuel in the land of Edom; these are the sons of Basemath, Esau’s wife. 18 These are the sons of Oholibamah, Esau’s wife: the chiefs Jeush, Jalam, and Korah; these are the chiefs born of Oholibamah the daughter of Anah, Esau’s wife. 19 These are the sons of Esau (that is, Edom), and these are their chiefs.

20 These are the sons of Seir the Horite, the inhabitants of the land: Lotan, Shobal, Zibeon, Anah, 21 Dishon, Ezer, and Dishan; these are the chiefs of the Horites, the sons of Seir in the land of Edom. 22 The sons of Lotan were Hori and Hemam; and Lotan’s sister was Timna. 23 These are the sons of Shobal: Alvan, Manahath, Ebal, Shepho, and Onam. 24 These are the sons of Zibeon: Aiah and Anah; he is the Anah who found the hot springs in the wilderness, as he pastured the donkeys of Zibeon his father. 25 These are the children of Anah: Dishon and Oholibamah the daughter of Anah. 26 These are the sons of Dishon: Hemdan, Eshban, Ithran, and Cheran. 27 These are the sons of Ezer: Bilhan, Zaavan, and Akan. 28 These are the sons of Dishan: Uz and Aran. 29 These are the chiefs of the Horites: the chiefs Lotan, Shobal, Zibeon, Anah, 30 Dishon, Ezer, and Dishan; these are the chiefs of the Horites, chief by chief in the land of Seir.

31 These are the kings who reigned in the land of Edom, before any king reigned over the Israelites. 32 Bela the son of Beor reigned in Edom, the name of his city being Dinhabah. 33 Bela died, and Jobab the son of Zerah of Bozrah reigned in his place. 34 Jobab died, and Husham of the land of the Temanites reigned in his place. 35 Husham died, and Hadad the son of Bedad, who defeated Midian in the country of Moab, reigned in his place, the name of his city being Avith. 36 Hadad died, and Samlah of Masrekah reigned in his place. 37 Samlah died, and Shaul of Rehoboth on the Euphrates2 reigned in his place. 38 Shaul died, and Baal-hanan the son of Achbor reigned in his place. 39 Baal-hanan the son of Achbor died, and Hadar reigned in his place, the name of his city being Pau; his wife’s name was Mehetabel, the daughter of Matred, daughter of Mezahab.

40 These are the names of the chiefs of Esau, according to their clans and their dwelling places, by their names: the chiefs Timna, Alvah, Jetheth, 41 Oholibamah, Elah, Pinon, 42 Kenaz, Teman, Mibzar, 43 Magdiel, and Iram; these are the chiefs of Edom (that is, Esau, the father of Edom), according to their dwelling places in the land of their possession.

Joseph’s Dreams

Jacob lived in the land of his father’s sojournings, in the land of Canaan.

These are the generations of Jacob.

Joseph, being seventeen years old, was pasturing the flock with his brothers. He was a boy with the sons of Bilhah and Zilpah, his father’s wives. And Joseph brought a bad report of them to their father. Now Israel loved Joseph more than any other of his sons, because he was the son of his old age. And he made him a robe of many colors.3 But when his brothers saw that their father loved him more than all his brothers, they hated him and could not speak peacefully to him.

Now Joseph had a dream, and when he told it to his brothers they hated him even more. He said to them, “Hear this dream that I have dreamed: Behold, we were binding sheaves in the field, and behold, my sheaf arose and stood upright. And behold, your sheaves gathered around it and bowed down to my sheaf.” His brothers said to him, “Are you indeed to reign over us? Or are you indeed to rule over us?” So they hated him even more for his dreams and for his words.

Then he dreamed another dream and told it to his brothers and said, “Behold, I have dreamed another dream. Behold, the sun, the moon, and eleven stars were bowing down to me.” 10 But when he told it to his father and to his brothers, his father rebuked him and said to him, “What is this dream that you have dreamed? Shall I and your mother and your brothers indeed come to bow ourselves to the ground before you?” 11 And his brothers were jealous of him, but his father kept the saying in mind.

Joseph Sold by His Brothers

12 Now his brothers went to pasture their father’s flock near Shechem. 13 And Israel said to Joseph, “Are not your brothers pasturing the flock at Shechem? Come, I will send you to them.” And he said to him, “Here I am.” 14 So he said to him, “Go now, see if it is well with your brothers and with the flock, and bring me word.” So he sent him from the Valley of Hebron, and he came to Shechem. 15 And a man found him wandering in the fields. And the man asked him, “What are you seeking?” 16 “I am seeking my brothers,” he said. “Tell me, please, where they are pasturing the flock.” 17 And the man said, “They have gone away, for I heard them say, ‘Let us go to Dothan.’” So Joseph went after his brothers and found them at Dothan.

18 They saw him from afar, and before he came near to them they conspired against him to kill him. 19 They said to one another, “Here comes this dreamer. 20 Come now, let us kill him and throw him into one of the pits.4 Then we will say that a fierce animal has devoured him, and we will see what will become of his dreams.” 21 But when Reuben heard it, he rescued him out of their hands, saying, “Let us not take his life.” 22 And Reuben said to them, “Shed no blood; throw him into this pit here in the wilderness, but do not lay a hand on him”—that he might rescue him out of their hand to restore him to his father. 23 So when Joseph came to his brothers, they stripped him of his robe, the robe of many colors that he wore. 24 And they took him and threw him into a pit. The pit was empty; there was no water in it.

25 Then they sat down to eat. And looking up they saw a caravan of Ishmaelites coming from Gilead, with their camels bearing gum, balm, and myrrh, on their way to carry it down to Egypt. 26 Then Judah said to his brothers, “What profit is it if we kill our brother and conceal his blood? 27 Come, let us sell him to the Ishmaelites, and let not our hand be upon him, for he is our brother, our own flesh.” And his brothers listened to him. 28 Then Midianite traders passed by. And they drew Joseph up and lifted him out of the pit, and sold him to the Ishmaelites for twenty shekels5 of silver. They took Joseph to Egypt.

29 When Reuben returned to the pit and saw that Joseph was not in the pit, he tore his clothes 30 and returned to his brothers and said, “The boy is gone, and I, where shall I go?” 31 Then they took Joseph’s robe and slaughtered a goat and dipped the robe in the blood. 32 And they sent the robe of many colors and brought it to their father and said, “This we have found; please identify whether it is your son’s robe or not.” 33 And he identified it and said, “It is my son’s robe. A fierce animal has devoured him. Joseph is without doubt torn to pieces.” 34 Then Jacob tore his garments and put sackcloth on his loins and mourned for his son many days. 35 All his sons and all his daughters rose up to comfort him, but he refused to be comforted and said, “No, I shall go down to Sheol to my son, mourning.” Thus his father wept for him. 36 Meanwhile the Midianites had sold him in Egypt to Potiphar, an officer of Pharaoh, the captain of the guard.

Judah and Tamar

It happened at that time that Judah went down from his brothers and turned aside to a certain Adullamite, whose name was Hirah. There Judah saw the daughter of a certain Canaanite whose name was Shua. He took her and went in to her, and she conceived and bore a son, and he called his name Er. She conceived again and bore a son, and she called his name Onan. Yet again she bore a son, and she called his name Shelah. Judah6 was in Chezib when she bore him.

And Judah took a wife for Er his firstborn, and her name was Tamar. But Er, Judah’s firstborn, was wicked in the sight of the LORD, and the LORD put him to death. Then Judah said to Onan, “Go in to your brother’s wife and perform the duty of a brother-in-law to her, and raise up offspring for your brother.” But Onan knew that the offspring would not be his. So whenever he went in to his brother’s wife he would waste the semen on the ground, so as not to give offspring to his brother. 10 And what he did was wicked in the sight of the LORD, and he put him to death also. 11 Then Judah said to Tamar his daughter-in-law, “Remain a widow in your father’s house, till Shelah my son grows up”—for he feared that he would die, like his brothers. So Tamar went and remained in her father’s house.

12 In the course of time the wife of Judah, Shua’s daughter, died. When Judah was comforted, he went up to Timnah to his sheepshearers, he and his friend Hirah the Adullamite. 13 And when Tamar was told, “Your father-in-law is going up to Timnah to shear his sheep,” 14 she took off her widow’s garments and covered herself with a veil, wrapping herself up, and sat at the entrance to Enaim, which is on the road to Timnah. For she saw that Shelah was grown up, and she had not been given to him in marriage. 15 When Judah saw her, he thought she was a prostitute, for she had covered her face. 16 He turned to her at the roadside and said, “Come, let me come in to you,” for he did not know that she was his daughter-in-law. She said, “What will you give me, that you may come in to me?” 17 He answered, “I will send you a young goat from the flock.” And she said, “If you give me a pledge, until you send it—” 18 He said, “What pledge shall I give you?” She replied, “Your signet and your cord and your staff that is in your hand.” So he gave them to her and went in to her, and she conceived by him. 19 Then she arose and went away, and taking off her veil she put on the garments of her widowhood.

20 When Judah sent the young goat by his friend the Adullamite to take back the pledge from the woman’s hand, he did not find her. 21 And he asked the men of the place, “Where is the cult prostitute7 who was at Enaim at the roadside?” And they said, “No cult prostitute has been here.” 22 So he returned to Judah and said, “I have not found her. Also, the men of the place said, ‘No cult prostitute has been here.’” 23 And Judah replied, “Let her keep the things as her own, or we shall be laughed at. You see, I sent this young goat, and you did not find her.”

24 About three months later Judah was told, “Tamar your daughter-in-law has been immoral.8 Moreover, she is pregnant by immorality.”9 And Judah said, “Bring her out, and let her be burned.” 25 As she was being brought out, she sent word to her father-in-law, “By the man to whom these belong, I am pregnant.” And she said, “Please identify whose these are, the signet and the cord and the staff.” 26 Then Judah identified them and said, “She is more righteous than I, since I did not give her to my son Shelah.” And he did not know her again.

27 When the time of her labor came, there were twins in her womb. 28 And when she was in labor, one put out a hand, and the midwife took and tied a scarlet thread on his hand, saying, “This one came out first.” 29 But as he drew back his hand, behold, his brother came out. And she said, “What a breach you have made for yourself!” Therefore his name was called Perez.10 30 Afterward his brother came out with the scarlet thread on his hand, and his name was called Zerah.

Joseph and Potiphar’s Wife

Now Joseph had been brought down to Egypt, and Potiphar, an officer of Pharaoh, the captain of the guard, an Egyptian, had bought him from the Ishmaelites who had brought him down there. The LORD was with Joseph, and he became a successful man, and he was in the house of his Egyptian master. His master saw that the LORD was with him and that the LORD caused all that he did to succeed in his hands. So Joseph found favor in his sight and attended him, and he made him overseer of his house and put him in charge of all that he had. From the time that he made him overseer in his house and over all that he had, the LORD blessed the Egyptian’s house for Joseph’s sake; the blessing of the LORD was on all that he had, in house and field. So he left all that he had in Joseph’s charge, and because of him he had no concern about anything but the food he ate.

Now Joseph was handsome in form and appearance. And after a time his master’s wife cast her eyes on Joseph and said, “Lie with me.” But he refused and said to his master’s wife, “Behold, because of me my master has no concern about anything in the house, and he has put everything that he has in my charge. He is not greater in this house than I am, nor has he kept back anything from me except you, because you are his wife. How then can I do this great wickedness and sin against God?” 10 And as she spoke to Joseph day after day, he would not listen to her, to lie beside her or to be with her.

11 But one day, when he went into the house to do his work and none of the men of the house was there in the house, 12 she caught him by his garment, saying, “Lie with me.” But he left his garment in her hand and fled and got out of the house. 13 And as soon as she saw that he had left his garment in her hand and had fled out of the house, 14 she called to the men of her household and said to them, “See, he has brought among us a Hebrew to laugh at us. He came in to me to lie with me, and I cried out with a loud voice. 15 And as soon as he heard that I lifted up my voice and cried out, he left his garment beside me and fled and got out of the house.” 16 Then she laid up his garment by her until his master came home, 17 and she told him the same story, saying, “The Hebrew servant, whom you have brought among us, came in to me to laugh at me. 18 But as soon as I lifted up my voice and cried, he left his garment beside me and fled out of the house.”

19 As soon as his master heard the words that his wife spoke to him, “This is the way your servant treated me,” his anger was kindled. 20 And Joseph’s master took him and put him into the prison, the place where the king’s prisoners were confined, and he was there in prison. 21 But the LORD was with Joseph and showed him steadfast love and gave him favor in the sight of the keeper of the prison. 22 And the keeper of the prison put Joseph in charge of all the prisoners who were in the prison. Whatever was done there, he was the one who did it. 23 The keeper of the prison paid no attention to anything that was in Joseph’s charge, because the LORD was with him. And whatever he did, the LORD made it succeed.

Joseph Interprets Two Prisoners’ Dreams

Some time after this, the cupbearer of the king of Egypt and his baker committed an offense against their lord the king of Egypt. And Pharaoh was angry with his two officers, the chief cupbearer and the chief baker, and he put them in custody in the house of the captain of the guard, in the prison where Joseph was confined. The captain of the guard appointed Joseph to be with them, and he attended them. They continued for some time in custody.

And one night they both dreamed—the cupbearer and the baker of the king of Egypt, who were confined in the prison—each his own dream, and each dream with its own interpretation. When Joseph came to them in the morning, he saw that they were troubled. So he asked Pharaoh’s officers who were with him in custody in his master’s house, “Why are your faces downcast today?” They said to him, “We have had dreams, and there is no one to interpret them.” And Joseph said to them, “Do not interpretations belong to God? Please tell them to me.”

So the chief cupbearer told his dream to Joseph and said to him, “In my dream there was a vine before me, 10 and on the vine there were three branches. As soon as it budded, its blossoms shot forth, and the clusters ripened into grapes. 11 Pharaoh’s cup was in my hand, and I took the grapes and pressed them into Pharaoh’s cup and placed the cup in Pharaoh’s hand.” 12 Then Joseph said to him, “This is its interpretation: the three branches are three days. 13 In three days Pharaoh will lift up your head and restore you to your office, and you shall place Pharaoh’s cup in his hand as formerly, when you were his cupbearer. 14 Only remember me, when it is well with you, and please do me the kindness to mention me to Pharaoh, and so get me out of this house. 15 For I was indeed stolen out of the land of the Hebrews, and here also I have done nothing that they should put me into the pit.”

16 When the chief baker saw that the interpretation was favorable, he said to Joseph, “I also had a dream: there were three cake baskets on my head, 17 and in the uppermost basket there were all sorts of baked food for Pharaoh, but the birds were eating it out of the basket on my head.” 18 And Joseph answered and said, “This is its interpretation: the three baskets are three days. 19 In three days Pharaoh will lift up your head—from you!—and hang you on a tree. And the birds will eat the flesh from you.”

20 On the third day, which was Pharaoh’s birthday, he made a feast for all his servants and lifted up the head of the chief cupbearer and the head of the chief baker among his servants. 21 He restored the chief cupbearer to his position, and he placed the cup in Pharaoh’s hand. 22 But he hanged the chief baker, as Joseph had interpreted to them. 23 Yet the chief cupbearer did not remember Joseph, but forgot him.

Footnotes

[1] 36:2 Hebrew; Samaritan, Septuagint, Syriac son; also verse 14
[2] 36:37 Hebrew the River
[3] 37:3 See Septuagint, Vulgate; or (with Syriac) a robe with long sleeves. The meaning of the Hebrew is uncertain; also verses 23, 32
[4] 37:20 Or cisterns; also verses 22, 24
[5] 37:28 A shekel was about 2/5 ounce or 11 grams
[6] 38:5 Hebrew He
[7] 38:21 Hebrew sacred woman; a woman who served a pagan deity by prostitution; also verse 22
[8] 38:24 Or has committed prostitution
[9] 38:24 Or by prostitution
[10] 38:29 Perez means a breach

Yes, Even You and I



Key Verse | Genesis 39:23

The keeper of the prison paid no attention to anything that was in Joseph's charge, because the LORD was with him. And whatever he did, the LORD made it succeed.

Bio | Jose Saenz

Hi, everyone! My name is Jose Saenz. I am from El Paso, and I currently serve on the community formation team while also attending the Watermark Residency. Anything and everything that I can tell you about myself has only been because of the Lord. He saved me from a life marked by the persona of a good Christian while living a completely different life. Now, my hope is that He would use my life to help others in a similar situation so they, too, can experience His perfect love.

Central Truth

God uses people to further His kingdom regardless of what they have done, which allows both believers and unbelievers alike to know Him personally.

Devotional | Genesis 36–40

Growing up in church, I loved the story of Joseph; it was an amazing example to me of what kindness and bravery look like. As I was reading through Genesis in the Watermark Institute, I was...

Growing up in church, I loved the story of Joseph; it was an amazing example to me of what kindness and bravery look like. As I was reading through Genesis in the Watermark Institute, I was reminded of this when I neared chapter 37. After reading through some terrible events like the fall and the flood and noting the continual wickedness of man, I was ready to read about Joseph. "Finally!" I thought. "A good character that I aspire to be like!"

Then I read Genesis 38: Judah and Tamar.

Why would Moses include such a wicked story about Judah sleeping with his daughter-in-law in the middle of Joseph's story? I didn't remember reading or hearing about this as a kid. Truthfully, it felt like a commercial break, especially since Genesis 39-40 continues Joseph's story with Potiphar's wife and interpreting the dreams of Pharaoh's cupbearer and baker. Then I learned something I never knew. I had always thought Joseph was Jesus' ancestor when it was actually Judah (Matthew 1:2-3). I thought, "Why would Jesus' lineage come from a man like Judah? He was a terrible man who did terrible things, yet God chose to use him?"

Then it hit me. The Lord uses sinful people like Judah the same way He uses sinful people today to further His kingdom. Yes, even you and I. I had somehow come to a place in my heart where I thought I could judge the Lord's character by whom He chose to use. I didn't realize I was just as guilty as the men who committed those sins. Looking back at Genesis 38, I realized that I'm a lot more like Judah than I am Joseph. Apart from Christ, I would choose to indulge in the flesh like Judah rather than deny the flesh as Joseph did. Despite all of this, Christ allows you and me to be a part of His plan. What a privilege that is! And this privilege is given because of His great love for us so we can know and help others know Him personally, no matter our backgrounds.

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Discussion Questions

1. Are there any events in your past that are causing you to doubt whether God can use you?

2. Who are some of the other heroes in the Bible that you've read about or heard of? What were some of the sins that they committed, and how did God still use them despite their shortcomings? 

3. How have you seen the Lord use you? What is the best way you can serve the Lord today and in the future?

9 Comments available

Linda Green 4 months ago

Yes, Jose! We can criticize people in the Bible until we see our sinful hearts as God does. Their terrible choices and God’s plan of redemption gives me hope for me and others.

Another take away for me in these chapters is that God isn’t limited by who someone’s parents are. I am reading, thinking “Disqualified!”, but God starts fresh with that person. Who would ever think that God would include Tamar’s sin Jesus’ family tree?

Another thing that helped me with all the brokenness in the Old Testament was the statement that the Bible reports on many things, but doesn’t condone them. Makes sense.

Eddie Fuller 4 months ago

Well done Jose and thank you! I loved your central truth.

Michael Scaman 4 months ago

Tamar may be the poster child of an abused woman in the Bible. In fact, there are 3 Tamars in the Bible and in a way all 3 affected by abuse.

First, Tamar who was used by one brother but denied a child in Genesis

Second, Tamar who was raped by her brother Amnon

Third, Tamar the daughter of Absolom (Tamar’s brother) Her father died as consequence of the anger and problems that spiraled out of control over the Amnon situation

Michael Scaman 4 months ago
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Sue, the story of Judah does feel strangely placed. I think the story of Judah placed in contrast to Joseph. Contrasting faithful Joseph with unfaithful problematic Judah. Both moved or were moved away from their brothers to live by themselves.

Additionally, it might be Judah was alienated from his brothers due to his role coming up with the idea for selling Joseph. It might be alienation and unfaithfulness and the story deliberately placed.

God resolved both the alienation of Judah and even Joseph in exile in the end.

Michael Scaman 4 months ago
Reply right arrow

The story of Joseph is also probably placed there to give hope. The Jews would spend centuries enslaved as Joseph was and the story of Joseph would be an encouragement of hope.

Sue Bohlin 4 months ago

Insightful devo, Jose!

I have learned that the story of Judah and Tamar, rather than a bizarrely-placed interruption in the Joseph story, is a well-placed fingerprint in the larger story arc. It helps us understand how Judah pivots in his self-centeredness and fleshliness, to become a far more gracious and honorable man several years down the road (which we will see later in Genesis). He was convicted by Tamar’s trust in Yahweh’s plan for widows, honoring her by saying, “She is more righteous than I.” His repentance changed him.

Reading again about how the Lord blessed everything Joseph did, not only giving him favor but also giving him administrative superpowers, enlarges my faith to pray for that kind of grace for others.

Greg Jones 4 months ago

For many years many scholars have looked at the story of Judah and Tamar and wondered why it is tucked into the middle of the Joseph account.

There is a theory the Judah Tamar account is layered with David and Bathsheba.

Parallels:

Judah/David shepherds/separate from kinsmen to Adullam(38:1;1Sam22:1)/Judah has friend Hirah/David has friend Hiram.

Judah’s wife is the daughter of Shua, Hebrew-Bathshua, much like Bathsheba. The writers of 1Chronicles see the connection and name Judah’s wife Bathshua(1Chronicels2:3) and David’s wife Bathshua rather than Bathsheba(1Chornicels3:5).

Tamar is Judah’s daughter in law, David’s daughter.

Scholars from different disciplines tell us ancient near eastern writers connected truth with meanings. Connecting truth to facts develops later in their history. Giving a flawed king, David, and a flawed nation, Judah, a flawed past is a truth meaning for early readers.

For more detail-Gary Rendsburg/The Genesis of the Bible or Pete Enns/The Bible Tells Me So.

Hope Harris 4 months ago

GM JTJ

I always struggle with the story of Judah. This morning it hit me that we are all broken fallen people in a broken fallen world.

God use broken people. Judah’s sin of insect and adultery is only one for of sexual and and relational brokenness. I lived for over 30 years as out and proud lesbian. Screaming for acceptance. While rejecting who God created me to be.

Over the last 11 years God has been restoring and healing my broken past. Teaching me what healthier relationships look like. Challenging me to live out a “holy sexuality…”

At the end of the day I am fallen broken woman who found Jesus. Without Him life would not be worth living. SO very grateful for the gift of salvation and redemption.

Hugh Stephenson 4 months ago

Q1 – If you asked me this question 10 years ago, I would start by listing off my church and spiritual resume; serving on committees, large gifts, head of capital campaigns, Sunday school teacher, lay reader, retreat leader etc.

This would be to give others envy.

Then, God showed me how ridiculous this is, (Isaiah 64:6). Then he showed me how He would use alcoholism, porn addiction, abortion, people pleasing and all manner of sin and rebellion.

This would be to give others hope.

Q2 – What a blessing God has given me to show me so many flawed but faithful heroes; Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Gideon, Barak, Samson, Jephthah, Samuel, David, all the Apostles but especially Peter & Paul, (Hebrews 11).

God is showing me that despite a lifetime of sin, rebellion and plenty of present struggles He is has given me purpose, plans and passion.

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