January 19, 2016

TO PREVENT BEGRUDGING A JUDGING, IT WOULD BE SMART TO CHECK OUR HEART BEFORE WE START.

Matthew 7:1–6

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Judging Others

“Judge not, that you be not judged. For with the judgment you pronounce you will be judged, and with the measure you use it will be measured to you. Why do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when there is the log in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother’s eye.

“Do not give dogs what is holy, and do not throw your pearls before pigs, lest they trample them underfoot and turn to attack you.

TO PREVENT BEGRUDGING A JUDGING, IT WOULD BE SMART TO CHECK OUR HEART BEFORE WE START.



Key Verse | Matthew 7:1

“Judge not, that you be not judged.” (Matthew 7:1)

Bio | Jeff Grandy

My name is Jeff Grandy. I am a lover of all things involving brisket. My favorite team is the Wheaton College Thunder. I have been married to my beautiful wife for four months. I don't always smile on the outside, but I'm happy on the inside. I love to dance to Michael Jackson tunes. On Mondays you will find me at Watermark for the Residency.

Central Truth

While culture disagrees, Jesus never calls us to turn a blind eye to what the Bible calls sin. After all, we are called to proclaim truth. We first, however, need to humbly evaluate ourselves, asking God to eliminate the hypocrisy in our own lives. Then, in light of the grace and mercy God has shown us, we reflect Christ’s truth and love to others.

 

 

Devotional | Matthew 7:1–6

“You can’t judge me!” Our culture is fond of this phrase, isn’t it? Society increasingly values the notion that individuals decide their own truth, and no one can tell them otherwise. Consequently, Matthew 7:1 has...

“You can’t judge me!” Our culture is fond of this phrase, isn’t it? Society increasingly values the notion that individuals decide their own truth, and no one can tell them otherwise. Consequently, Matthew 7:1 has been widely misquoted and mistakenly used in attempts to silence Christians from speaking God’s truth. How do we respond to a culture that believes there is no absolute truth and uses this verse to support its argument? Let us prayerfully consider what this passage does not mean, and—as with any other passage—also study the surrounding context.

First, Matthew 7:1-6 does not mean that we must never point out others’ sin. That would contradict our calling to speak truth when one is caught in sin (Galatians 6:1). It would even contradict verse 6 of our passage for today. We are blessed to have God’s Word—the truth and authority of life—and we are meant to use it, proclaim it, and direct society with it (2 Timothy 3:16).

So, what does it mean? Consider chapters 5-6 of Matthew that lead up to this passage. Christ encourages His disciples to be poor in spirit and practice humility. He calls us to be unlike the Pharisees—hypocrites with selfish motives. They “judged” others to condemn them and boost their own egos and status. Jesus commands less selfishness and more selflessness.

This is, therefore, a heart issue, my friends. It is all about our motives and intentions. We are called to speak out against sin for purposes of helping, not hurting. As Dietrich Bonhoeffer says in The Cost of Discipleship, “I am not forbidden to have my own thoughts about the other person, to realize his shortcomings, but only to the extent that it offers to me an occasion for forgiveness and unconditional love, as Jesus proves to me.”

We can set our hearts correctly toward Jesus by first honestly evaluating ourselves and remembering the grace and mercy Christ has shown us. Then, with love and humility, we point others toward that same saving truth of Christ (Matthew 7:3-5).

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Discussion Questions

1. Have you ever felt like someone was hypocritically judging you? If so, how did it make you feel?

2. Have you ever been accused of hypocritically judging someone else? If so, how did you respond?

3. What are some ways we can make sure to rebuke sin with proper motives to love, edify, and encourage, and not out of selfish ambition?

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